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Tuesday, August 20, 2019

7 Education Trends That Are Driving Tech Implementations | Education Market - XaaS Journal

Today’s classrooms rely on digital access to information, mobile communication, secure networks and tools that help students achieve at their own pace by Mike Monocello, former owner of a software development company.

Photo: XaaS Journal
Many trends in the education market are technology-driven. Classrooms from kindergarten to doctoral degree courses have evolved from the traditional pedagogy method of a teacher in front of a class to employing a variety of IT solutions that keep students engaged and learning. Managed services providers (MSPs) and value-added resellers (VARs) should evaluate their education vertical prospects’ needs in areas including:
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Source: XaaS Journal

Google Lens, Augmented Reality, and the Future of Learning | Gear - WIRED

Lauren Goode, senior writer at WIRED explains, Why take a boring selfie in front of the Mona Lisa when you can use AR to dive deep into it?

Photo: Cera Hensley
Did you know that the painter Rockwell Kent, whose splendorous Afternoon on the Sea, Monhegan hangs in San Francisco's de Young Museum, worked on murals and advertisements for General Electric and Rolls-Royce? I did not, until I visited Gallery 29 on a recent Tuesday afternoon, phone in hand.

Because the de Young's curators worked with Google to turn some of the informational placards that hang next to paintings into virtual launchpads, any placard that includes an icon for Google Lens—the name of the company's visual search software—is now a cue. Point the camera at the icon and a search result pops up, giving you more information about the work. (You can access Google Lens on the iPhone within the Google search app for iOS or within the native camera app on Android phones.)...

It's too early to say how well we learn things through augmented reality. AR lacks totality by definition—unlike VR, it enhances the real world but doesn't replace it—and it's hard to say what that means for memory retention, says Michael Tarr, a cognitive science researcher at Carnegie Mellon University. “There is a difference between the emotional and visceral responses that happen when something is experienced as a real event or thing and when something is experienced as a digital or pictorial implementation of a thing,” he says.
Read more...

Source: WIRED

The 38 New Skills You Can Now Learn on LinkedIn Learning | New Courses - The Learning Blog

Each week presents a new opportunity for you and your team to learn the skills necessary to take on the next big challenge, suggest Zoë Kelsey, Learning Supporter.

Photo:  Learning Blog - LinkedIn Learning
At LinkedIn Learning, we want to do everything we can to help make that happen. Each week, we add to our 14,000+ course library. This past week we added 38 courses. What can you expect from the new additions to the library?

If you’re a security buff, this is your week. With a cyber attack occurring every 39 seconds, many of us want to upskill to protect our work (and even personal) systems. Check out the four new courses on security to help you prevent a cyber attack.

Upskilling in cybersecurity not in the cards for you this week? Check out the 34 other courses now available with a wide selection of creative courses, from learning video production to laser cutting.

The new courses now available on LinkedIn Learning are:
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Additional resources 
Want to see what else we offer?
View all of LinkedIn Learning's 14,000+ courses today. 


Source:
LinkedIn Learning

How to Mow Your Lawn Using Math | Science - Popular Mechanics

We came up with the calculations, says Dave Linkletter, Ph.D. candidate in Pure Mathematics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Photo: Remus Kotsel/Getty Images
Dedicating years of schooling to pursue higher math degrees may help solve certain problems, but does it make any difference for something as simple as cutting your grass? To find out, I spent the week discussing the mathematics of lawn mowing with my colleagues at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Our thoughts generally split into two directions: If your lawn is simple enough, then you can do some fairly specific calculations to figure out the most efficient way to mow it. But if your lawn is weird enough, it might resemble a famous mathematical allegory.

So first you have to ask the question, “What is the topology of my lawn?” Topology is a branch of math that’s only officially existed for about a century. Some mathematicians call it “wiggly geometry” or “geometry without measuring.” Topology studies how regions and surfaces are similar or different, but not in terms of measurements like in geometry.

You can remember it like this: “What’s the volume of a sphere?” is a geometry question. “What’s the difference between a sphere and a donut?” is a topology question...

If you need to mow a sprawling lawn, it might translate into a fun little Graph Theory problem. But if you’ve been mowing it for years, you probably already have the hang on mowing it efficiently. You don’t need advanced math to solve this problem—maybe just to talk about it more abstractly.

Maths and tech specialists need Hippocratic oath, says academic | Mathematics - The Guardian

Exclusive: Hannah Fry says ethical pledge needed in tech fields that will shape future by Ian Sample, science editor of the Guardian.

Hannah Fry: ‘The future doesn’t just happen. We are building it all the time.’
Photo: Paul Wilkinson
Mathematicians, computer engineers and scientists in related fields should take a Hippocratic oath to protect the public from powerful new technologies under development in laboratories and tech firms, a leading researcher has said.

The ethical pledge would commit scientists to think deeply about the possible applications of their work and compel them to pursue only those that, at the least, do no harm to society.

Hannah Fry, an associate professor in the mathematics of cities at University College London, said an equivalent of the doctor’s oath was crucial given that mathematicians and computer engineers were building the tech that would shape society’s future.

“We need a Hippocratic oath in the same way it exists for medicine,” Fry said. “In medicine, you learn about ethics from day one. In mathematics, it’s a bolt-on at best. It has to be there from day one and at the forefront of your mind in every step you take.”...

The lectures, to be broadcast on BBC Four, will be only the fourth in nearly 200 years to focus on mathematics.

“One of the problems maths struggles with is that it’s invisible,” Fry said. We haven’t got explosions on our side. But despite being invisible, mathematics has a dramatic impact on our lives, and at this point in history that’s more pertinent than it’s ever been.”
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Source: The Guardian 

Sunday, August 18, 2019

Twist in the tale as bookshops shut | Companies - The Australian Financial Review

Luke Housego, journalist for The Australian Financial Review reports, It is eight years since the collapse of Angus & Robertson and Borders sent shockwaves through the market and left the nation's booksellers to contemplate whether this was the writing on the wall.

Hamish Alcorn and Dawn Albiner of Archives Fine Books launched an e-commerce portal for their store to boost sales last year.
Photo: Attila Csaszar
But when sales of e-books hit 20 per cent and refused to go higher, the narrative turned more upbeat. Until recently, that is, when a series of landmark bookshops began closing their doors up and down the east coast.

After 46 years serving Sydney's north shore, Lindfield Bookshop will close on August 24. In Mosman, Pages and Pages will end 20 years of trading in September, citing a looming recession. And Dymocks in Sydney's Lane Cove closed abruptly last month when the landlord retook possession,

In Melbourne, Embiggen Books shut its doors in June. In Brisbane a couple of secondhand bookstores have closed in recent months. And academic text specialist Co-op has closed more than two dozen stores since 2015.

It sounds like a tragedy. But despite the spate of recent closures, there is some cause for optimism...

With generational change, digital investment will become more important for retailers as more consumers move online, Ms Sanders said. Those able to seamlessly integrate their online and offline presence will be most likely to succeed.

But for smaller independent bookshop owners, a shortage of time and money means any significant investment is out of reach.

"You need an online presence in some form or another, even if your web store isn't the primary driver of sales, It's just that's the way the world runs now," said Australian Booksellers Association chief executive Robbie Egan.
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Source: The Australian Financial Review

25 Books Every Woman Should Read | Books - Oprah Mag

How many of these are in your library? by Leigh Haber, Books Editor for O, the Oprah Magazine and Michelle Hart, Assistant Books Editor of O, the Oprah Magazine.


Women may not yet run the world but we do make for some of the most intriguing characters. Who are some of the most compelling all-time heroinesreal-life or fictional—ever to captivate our readerly imaginations? O’s Books Editor Leigh Haber, and Assistant Editor Michelle Hart offer their take on some of the best books every woman should read, a mix of classic and contemporary works that satisfy the bibliophile’s desire for total immersion.
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Source: Oprah Mag

100 books to read in a lifetime — according to Amazon Books editors | Book recommendations - Business Insider


As of 2010, there were about 129,864,880 books in the entire world, according to Google's estimate

Photo: Alyssa Powell/Business Insider
Even if you quit your job, subsisted off of dewdrops, and spent every waking hour reading, the odds that you could read every one of them are not in your favor.

So, for book-lovers, it becomes important to choose your next tome wisely. Before slipping into a 500-page and many-hours-long disappointment that could have been invested into something more worthy of our finite time, we read reviews, skim Goodreads lists, ask bookstore staff and friends and family, and use myriad other tactics to narrow our choices down to the best and most impactful.

Below, you'll find 100 suggestions for books you should read in a lifetime, according to Amazon Books editors. Spanning beloved children's classics to searing memoirs to classics, the list has a little bit of everything. If you're looking for the Next Great Thing, here's a good place to start your search. 

The Festival of Books is a paradise for bibliophiles | Columnists - The San Diego Union-Tribune

The Liberty Station event on Aug. 24 will be a grand celebration of reading, says Richard Lederer, named International Punster of the Year and Toastmasters International’s Golden Gavel winner.

Linda Howley entertains the crowd at the Children’s Pavilion at a previous festival.
Photo: Eduardo Contreras / San Diego Union-Tribune file
Enjoy these four lines of wisdom written by San Diego’s own Dr. Seuss:
The more that you read,
The more that you know.
The more that you learn,
The more places you’ll go.


In other words, books prepare you for adventure without your making reservations or taking suitcases. Or as Emily Dickinson wrote, “How frugal is the chariot that bears a human soul.”

A week from today, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., the Union-Tribune will launch our city’s third annual Festival of Books. The celebration will be at 2620 Truxtun Road, Liberty Station, in Point Loma. Along with a galaxy of local authors, I’ll be signing my books in Author Alley. I’d love to meet you there.

The Festival of Books connects San Diego-area readers, booksellers, authors and businesses with their common love of the written word. For details about authors, exhibitors, book stores, panels, children’s activities, music and food please take a tour of the special section about the festival in tomorrow’s paper...

Books live. Books endure and prevail. Books are humanity in print. Books are the diary of the human race. By entering books, we become all that we have read.
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Source: The San Diego Union-Tribune

Books that Will Help You Kick Your Tech Dependence | Books & Media - Outside

Four authors on paying attention, savoring silence, getting off the grid, and living peaceably with technology by Heather Hansman, Seattle-based freelance writer.

Photo: R_Tee/iStock
A few weeks back, I was antsy in a way that I couldn’t explain. My head was swimming from a bunch of weeks on the road for work, which turned into both too much and not enough time with people. I was tired no matter how much I slept. Inside all the time. Sucked into the cycle of: delete Instagram, then redownload Instagram and numb brain with other people’s stories of their shiny lives, feel shitty (repeat forever?). 
 
So one Saturday afternoon back home, annoyed with myself and unwilling to submit anyone else to my attitude, I took off for the woods alone. Wine can, sandwich, warm layer, book. South down the Pacific Crest Trail toward a lake I was pretty sure was pretty. At the lake, I set up my tent and shook out my sleeping bag, then sat on a log near the muddy shore and cracked open the can and the book. 
 
Before I even made it through the introduction, I realized I’d chosen well. Sometimes, I think, books show up in your life at exactly the right time...

Rain rolled in over the lake as I slept, and in the morning, I lay in the tent with How to Do Nothing, listening for a break in the storm. For the first time in a long time, I did not anxiously check my phone or internally berate myself for not getting up earlier. I just stayed. 
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Source: Outside