Translate into a different language

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

New eBook: 84 Tips on New Instructional Design for New Instructional Technology

Today’s learning professionals have myriad technology options for designing, developing, and delivering content, from virtual labs and graphic novels to social media and wearable devices. Even artificial intelligence promises to be an effective learning technology in the near future.


In this eBook 21 learning professionals who have successfully melded new instructional design with new instructional technologies give us their best tips. Regardless of what technologies you’re using currently, you’re bound to find tips that will help you design more effectively for those technologies. 

The 84 tips cover topics including:
  • Putting learning goals and needs before technology
  • Planning for and managing new instructional technology
  • Developing with and blending instructional technologies
  • Leveraging instructional technology for language learning
  • Learning games and gamification
  • Driving learning with graphic novels
  • Making learning mobile
  • Using MOOCs
  • Sharing learning-technology expertise
 Download now

Source: The eLearning Guild


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

New eBook: 84 Tips on New Instructional Design for New Instructional Technology

Today’s learning professionals have myriad technology options for designing, developing, and delivering content, from virtual labs and graphic novels to social media and wearable devices. Even artificial intelligence promises to be an effective learning technology in the near future.


In this eBook 21 learning professionals who have successfully melded new instructional design with new instructional technologies give us their best tips. Regardless of what technologies you’re using currently, you’re bound to find tips that will help you design more effectively for those technologies. 

The 84 tips cover topics including:
  • Putting learning goals and needs before technology
  • Planning for and managing new instructional technology
  • Developing with and blending instructional technologies
  • Leveraging instructional technology for language learning
  • Learning games and gamification
  • Driving learning with graphic novels
  • Making learning mobile
  • Using MOOCs
  • Sharing learning-technology expertise
 Download now

Source: The eLearning Guild


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Sunday, June 01, 2014

Nontraditional students achieve their dreams, graduate from college

Going back to college meant Christopher L. Post spent a lot of late nights with his head buried in books.
But devoting all that time to furthering his education also meant more chores around the house for his kids, no family vacations and asking his wife and family to cut back without his regular income.

Photo: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 Post’s story of heading back to college later in life plays out routinely at places like Empire State College, the State University of New York’s liberal arts college that caters to what are considered “nontraditional” students. That definition is typically based on a student’s age and part-time status. And it turns out that there are now more college students like Post than the traditional, 18- to 22-year-olds.

In 2011, more people in the United States enrolled as part-time college students who were age 25 and above than entered college for the first time as a full-time student, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

Post had once enrolled at St. Bonaventure University and also attended Jamestown Community College, but he didn’t get his degree when he was younger. He took a break from school, moved to Florida and then began careers in the restaurant and retail business.

When his employer closed in 2010, he decided it was time to go back to college. On Saturday, he received a master’s degree in teaching and served as the graduate student speaker during the ceremony.
Read more...

Source: The Buffalo News


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Nontraditional students achieve their dreams, graduate from college

Going back to college meant Christopher L. Post spent a lot of late nights with his head buried in books.
But devoting all that time to furthering his education also meant more chores around the house for his kids, no family vacations and asking his wife and family to cut back without his regular income.

Photo: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 Post’s story of heading back to college later in life plays out routinely at places like Empire State College, the State University of New York’s liberal arts college that caters to what are considered “nontraditional” students. That definition is typically based on a student’s age and part-time status. And it turns out that there are now more college students like Post than the traditional, 18- to 22-year-olds.

In 2011, more people in the United States enrolled as part-time college students who were age 25 and above than entered college for the first time as a full-time student, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

Post had once enrolled at St. Bonaventure University and also attended Jamestown Community College, but he didn’t get his degree when he was younger. He took a break from school, moved to Florida and then began careers in the restaurant and retail business.

When his employer closed in 2010, he decided it was time to go back to college. On Saturday, he received a master’s degree in teaching and served as the graduate student speaker during the ceremony.
Read more...

Source: The Buffalo News


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Stanford Report Shares Snapshot of Online Learning

Campus Technology summarizes, "A new report from Stanford University examining the use of online technologies and methods for delivering education says that 1.9 million people around the world have registered for one or more of the public courses taught by the California university's faculty."

According to "Stanford Online: 2013 in Review," since fall 2012 four million hours of instruction have been delivered. That delivery of massive open online courses (MOOCs) takes place on three platforms: Coursera, NovoEd and Stanford OpenEdX.

"Stanford's vision is much broader than MOOCs," said Vice Provost John Mitchell, who directs VPOL. "We're thinking about how we will best educate students for generations to come."
That exploration, he added, moves the focus away from MOOC "completion rates," and towards how participants engage with the material. "In the process, we are asking important questions: How can we help students learn more effectively? How can we better leverage classroom time? How can technology enable educators to better meet the needs of particular learners?"
Read more...

Source: Campus Technology


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Stanford Report Shares Snapshot of Online Learning

Campus Technology summarizes, "A new report from Stanford University examining the use of online technologies and methods for delivering education says that 1.9 million people around the world have registered for one or more of the public courses taught by the California university's faculty."

According to "Stanford Online: 2013 in Review," since fall 2012 four million hours of instruction have been delivered. That delivery of massive open online courses (MOOCs) takes place on three platforms: Coursera, NovoEd and Stanford OpenEdX.

"Stanford's vision is much broader than MOOCs," said Vice Provost John Mitchell, who directs VPOL. "We're thinking about how we will best educate students for generations to come."
That exploration, he added, moves the focus away from MOOC "completion rates," and towards how participants engage with the material. "In the process, we are asking important questions: How can we help students learn more effectively? How can we better leverage classroom time? How can technology enable educators to better meet the needs of particular learners?"
Read more...

Source: Campus Technology


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!