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Thursday, September 20, 2018

Complimentary Trainers Guide | Association for Talent Development

Whether you are just getting started as a trainer or are a seasoned talent development professional, planning your training sessions is an important key to success. 

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The topics covered in this guide will help you think beyond modules and training sessions and instead help you deliver effortless learning experiences.
The learner’s experience is an essential factor determining whether or not the learning will stick. Their experience doesn’t start when they enter the classroom, it starts when they sign up for the course. Are you doing everything you can to make that process painless and exciting?
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In this guide, we’ll go over how to:

  • Create nurturing learning environments.
  • Identify the five most effective skills trainers need to have.
  • Deal with challenging participants.
  • Keep your training programs funde
Source: Association for Talent Development


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Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Watch movies for free online? EU study reveals users face THOUSANDS of malware threats when visiting sites that offer pirated digital content | Daily Mail

  • Experts found the files hidden in fake game installers and other free software
  • The 200GB of malicious files were analysed by law enforcement Europol
  • This revealed websites containing malware were mainly hosted in the US
  • Websites with .com domain names were also the most likely to contain malware

Experts from the European Union Intellectual Property Office in Spain uncovered the files hidden in fake game installers and other free programmes that give hackers access to your device, as Daily Mail reports. 

Downloading movies illegally online isn't just putting you at risk of falling foul of the courts, a new study suggests. Thousands of users are putting themselves at risk of infection by malicious apps when they visit websites that offer pirated content (artist's impression).
Photo: European Union Intellectual Property Office 

Downloading and streaming movies illegally isn't just putting you at risk of falling foul of the law, according to a new study into malware.

Thousands of users are putting themselves at risk of infection by malicious apps when they visit websites that offer pirated content.

European Union (EU) researchers located 4 000 malicious files in their search, which originated from approximately 100 individually developed pieces of malware.

That includes fake game installers and free programmes to promise to let you access and stream pirated content, but actually give hackers access to your device...

The files extracted by the researchers came from sites and mobile applications suspected of sharing pirated films, music, video games and TV shows.

They were designed to lure users into sharing credit card details, social network logins or other personal data.

'Our previous research has shown that over half of digital natives say they consider the safety of a site to be a priority when accessing content online,' said Christian Archambeau, acting executive director of the EUIPO.

'Our findings are important for all online users, of whatever age, as they highlight the inherent dangers in copyright-infringing sites.

Source: Daily Mail


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How to share difficult feedback with employees | Community - TrainingZone.co.uk

"Being the bearer of bad news is neither fun nor easy. While many in this situation default to beating around the bush, or worse, avoiding the critical feedback altogether, managers have more success by being direct (although not harsh) very early on." summarizes Jennifer Kirkwood, focus is making training relevant to employees and organizations.

Photo: Pexels
First, take a few minutes to talk about something other than work. Research shows that as little as a few minutes of upfront conversation unrelated to the matter at hand dramatically increases the level of collaboration going forward.

Next, ease into the conversation with a gentle warning that emotionally prepares the listener: “I have some unfortunate feedback to share with you.”

Proceed by sharing three pieces of information:
  • Your attitude toward the employee
  • The feedback itself
  • How you feel about the feedback
For example, “I really value you as a member of our team, and would like to see you grow with the company. Nevertheless, I cannot promote you at this time. I feel bad, and wish this weren’t the case.”...

One of the hazards to be wary of in this type of conversation is the conflation of your relationship with the decision at hand, e.g., “If you really appreciate me as a worker, you would promote me.” Should you encounter this, address both aspects of the assertion independently. First, address the relationship component (e.g., you must not appreciate me as a worker) until the matter is resolved. For example, “I do appreciate you. I’m sorry if I haven’t done enough to express that appreciation. I have tried, though, and will continue to try. Have there been other times you haven’t felt appreciated?” Once that has been addressed, share the reasons behind your feedback/ decision.

Throughout the conversation, provide an opportunity to ask questions and to share the employee’s perspectives (supported by data). Ensure that he or she understands the feedback and rationale, since understanding generally leads to acceptance.
Read more...

Source: TrainingZone


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What Are We Communicating to Students When We Write? | Teaching Professor Blog

"Do we communicate more with students in writing than we used to?" according to Maryellen Weimer, PhD.
 

Photo: iStockphoto
 I think so. In addition to the course syllabus, the usual handouts, and written feedback on papers, projects, and performances, we now share all kinds of electronic messages with students. We exchange emails, post announcements on course management systems, and participate in online discussions. Those who use PowerPoint tend to make rather text-heavy slides. And if you happen to teach online, then virtually all your communication with students occurs via some written format.

First and foremost, all of these written materials communicate messages about the course and its conduct. But beyond this explicit information are other, more subtle messages. They are conveyed not as much by what we say as by how we say it. Without the benefit of tone, facial expressions, and other nonverbal cues, written communication creates new challenges for establishing a positive learning environment.

Several parameters guide our written communication with students. We need to be polite, and most of us are. We need to be professional, and most of us don’t have a problem with that either...

The syllabi study did not consider how impressions about the course and instructor are mediated when the teacher presents and discusses the syllabus in person. But often the syllabus is now a stand-alone introduction to the course and instructor. That’s almost always the case in online courses, but even in face-to-face courses the syllabus is often posted on the course website before the class convenes. So, students start to form their impressions before the first class.

I wonder if we are as aware of the “tonal” messages in our written communications as we should be. Often, we have so many assignments to grade that we get tired and the comments can become cryptic. Students, personally vested in their work, respond viscerally to teacher comments, especially those that point out flaws. Yes, they need to grow up and learn from negative feedback, but growing up is a process. How can we make it a constructive experience?
Read more...

Source: Teaching Professor Blog


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Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Predicting? Then optimize prediction not modeling | Cambridge University Press


Prediction, one of the most important practical applications of statistical analysis, has rarely been treated as anything more than an afterthought in most formal treatments of statistical inference.

Predictive Statistics
Analysis and Inference beyond Models
This important book aims to counter this neglect by a wholehearted emphasis on prediction as the primary purpose of the analysis. The authors cut a broad swathe through the statistical landscape, conducting thorough analyses of numerous traditional, recent, and novel techniques, to show how these are illuminated by taking the predictive perspective.' 
Philip Dawid, University of Cambridge.



  • Connects statistical theory directly to the goals of machine learning, data mining, and modern applied science
  • Positions statisticians to cope with emerging, non-traditional data types
  • Well-documented R code in a Github repository allows readers to replicate examples
  •  
    Connects statistical theory directly to the goals of machine learning, data mining, and modern applied science Positions statisticians to cope with emerging, non-traditional data types Well-documented R code in a Github repository allows readers to replicate examples Aimed at statisticians and machine learners, this retooling of statistical theory asserts that high-quality prediction should be the guiding principle of modeling and learning from data, then shows how. The fully predictive approach to statistical problems outlined embraces traditional subfields and 'black box' settings, with computed examples.  
    Read more... 

    Enjoy your reading!

    Source: Cambridge University Press


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    The 37 New Skills You Can Now Learn on LinkedIn Learning | Learning Blog - LinkedIn Learning

    Paul Petrone, Marketing Manager at LinkedIn says, "Each week presents a new opportunity for you and your team to learn the skills necessary to take on the next big challenge."
     

    Photo:  Learning Blog - LinkedIn Learning

    And, at LinkedIn Learning, we want to do everything we can to help make that happen.
    So, each week, we add to our 12,000+ course library. And this past week was no different, as we added 37 new courses covering everything from sales to IT to user experience.

    The new courses now available on LinkedIn Learning are:
    Read more... 

    Recommended Reading  

    Photo:  Learning Blog - LinkedIn Learning
    You know all those articles predicting of a time when artificial intelligence will take over the world, forever changing it? Well, those days are no longer theoretical.

    Source: Learning Blog - LinkedIn Learning


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    Nigel Shadbolt on why the UK is well placed to lead on the ethics of AI | ComputerWeekly.com -TechTarget

    Sir Nigel Shadbolt will take part in a panel on “augmented humanity”, associated with Computer Weekly, at the Oxford Science and Ideas Festival on 19 October 2018.


    The UK has a genuine opportunity to take a lead on the ethics of artificial intelligence, says Nigel Shadbolt, principal of Jesus College, Oxford and co-founder of the Open Data Institute (ODI).

    Photo: ComputerWeekly.com

    Indeed, many of the most important issues thrown up by AI – which Shadbolt began researching in the 1970s and early 1980s – are ethical in nature, he says. And he explores the gamut of these issues in a book he has co-written with Roger Hampson, The Digital Ape: how to live (in peace) with smart machines.

    Hampson was chief executive officer at the London Borough of Redbridge for 16 years, and is a non-executive director of the ODI...

    The title of the book is a homage to Desmond Morris’ 1967 book, The Naked Ape. “All this technology, same old ape,” says Shadbolt.

    And he does not have in mind just homo sapiens, but all hominins. “We were making tools for 200,000 generations before even modern human beings appeared on the scene,” says Shadbolt. “That has shaped our neurology, our motor coordination, as well as our social coordination. So it isn’t new that technology is going to change us.”

    Does he expect advanced artificial intelligence technologies to change us again?
    Read more...

    Additional resources 

    Download this free guide

    Artificial Intelligence 101: Jargon Buster 3 key definitions and 6 in-depth articles focused on understanding how Artificial Intelligence can bring about immense commercial benefit for your organisation.
    Download this free guide

    Source: ComputerWeekly.com -TechTarget


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    Monday, September 17, 2018

    Why Mobile Marketers Need To Think Like Statisticians | Mobile - MediaPost Communications

    Alexei Chemenda, Chief Revenue Officer for Apps and Managing Director, U.S at Adikteev reports, "Mobile marketers need to embrace statistical models to avoid drawing inaccurate conclusions about retargeting active users."


    A statistician's wife has twins. He is delighted. He rings the minister, who says, "Bring them to church Sunday and we'll baptize them.” "No," replies the statistician. "Baptize one. We’ll keep the other as a control.”

    Just a little statistician humor for you! But jokes aside, mobile marketers need to embrace statistical models to avoid drawing inaccurate conclusions about their marketing, specifically when retargeting active users. Too often, marketers use return on ad spend (ROAS) to assess the effectiveness of their retargeting campaigns, but this can be a misleading figure because it does not account for actions that might have happened anyway, even if you had not served users ads.
     
    When scientists conduct clinical research, they commonly use the intention-to-treat (ITT) protocol to provide an unbiased comparison of the treatment groups. The ITT approach is also the key to calculating incrementality  the measure of revenue lift generated by your ad spend, but the majority of marketers aren’t using it. Here’s a simplified look at how it works.


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    What can we learn from Malta’s digital ambitions? | Regulatory Compliance - IDG Connect

    Bianca Wright, UK-based freelance business and technology writer observes, "For a truly digital economy to succeed, regulation needs to be in place to ensure that technologies are deployed ethically and to the benefit of users. In reality, though, regulation often lags behind technologies, playing an endless game of catch-up as innovation outpaces legislation." 

    Photo: Shutterstock

    The small island nation of Malta, however, aims to change that, positioning itself at the forefront of blockchain deployment and concurrently setting up a regulatory body to oversee the deployment.

    The newly-created Malta Digital Innovation Authority will take responsibility for the regulation not only of distributed ledger technology [DLT] as initially proposed, but also for “AI [artificial intelligence], IoT [Internet of Things], Quantum technology, and big data,” according to parliamentary secretary Silvio Schemer. According to the Times of Malta, the authority was set up to regulate locally-based businesses working with smart contracts and distributed ledger technology, or blockchain. It was established as part of Malta’s push to become a leader in the DLT space...

    Leading the way 
    Other countries, it seems, are already taking note and looking to Malta for models of how to get such regulatory frameworks right. Tucker explains that certain jurisdictions in the US are learning from this approach already. “Wyoming passed seven pieces of legislation that had all the right structures, with the recognition that we really are dealing with something very different from traditional finance. It's not just about the legislation; the laws have the right spirit of welcoming and encouraging,” he says.

    The Malta Financial Services Authority (MFSA) is already consulting with a number of European regulators by sharing its experience in establishing the Maltese regulatory framework (the Virtual Financial Asset Act). “While Malta is still in the very early stages of development, this transparent approach to sharing experience in order to establish a clear regulatory framework is something that other countries should be looking to follow,” Zarya says. “In the coming years there will no doubt be significant success stories of these businesses operating in Malta as the country becomes a hub for the digital economy.”
    Read more...

    Source: IDG Connect


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    Combining AI and neuroscience to transform lifelong learning | Develop - TrainingZone

    Photo: Dr Boris Altemeyer
    Learning is a natural human function. It’s how we progress, grow and develop, especially in our early years. However, in our culture we have tended to see the end of university as the end of our formal education. Discover here how AI and machine learning can nurture lifelong learning and help us transition into more fulfilling and meaningful jobs, according to Dr Boris Altemeyer, Business Psychologist and Chief Scientific Officer at predictive people analytics company Cognisess.

    Photo: Just_Super/iStock

    When in a job, we transition into learning that’s beneficial to the organisations we work for and relevant to our existing skills and experience – and that is often legislation and process driven, rather than inspired and inspiring.

    This misses out on an enormous opportunity, as learning throughout our lives is a real gift and allows us to give meaning to our daily activities and progression through life. Lifelong learning is more accessible now than ever before. It’s coming up to 50 years since the founding of the Open University, which was one of the first establishments to break down the barriers of formal education.

    And with access to a whole world of learning through Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCS) and online platforms such as TedTalks, we have finally started to master the art of ‘in the moment’ learning, with content that is delivered in an engaging way available on mobile devices 24/7...

    Learning in older age
    From a cognitive perspective, people are able to learn throughout their whole lives. During my own PhD research, we compared cognitive abilities across two specific age groups. Students who were aged between 18 and 27 years old and older people between 60 and 86 years of age.

    We conducted various different experiments looking at Motor Orientation, Rapid Visual Processing, Spatial Working Memory, Crystallized Intelligence, Memory, and many others.

    There were some differences in specific tests, such as reaction times. But the differences that we hypothesized between the two age groups, due mainly to the cognitive decline in the older age group, were not supported by the results.

    If retirees keep mentally active and physically healthy there is barely any difference.
    Read more...

    Source: TrainingZone


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