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Wednesday, August 03, 2016

Does philosophy have a problem with women? | Opinion | | The Guardian


Critical Reflections on Ownership (Edward Elgar) by Mary Warnock and Freedom Regained: The Possibility of Free Will (Granta) by Julian Baggini are both out now.

"Only 25% of philosophy posts in UK universities are occupied by women. So what, if anything, should be done to redress the balance?" insist crossbench life peer, moral philosopher and author of a number of books on philosophy and Julian Baggini, author of Freedom Regained: The Possibility of Free Will (Granta). He also runs the website Microphilosophy. 

Mary Warnock, philosopher and writer
This question has been debated by women and men in philosophy for years, and last week became the cover story in the Times Literary Supplement. Of all the humanities departments in British universities, only philosophy departments have a mere 25% women members. Why should this be? How can the balance be redressed? On the whole I am very much against intervention, by quotas or otherwise, to increase women’s chances of employment, whatever the field, and there is nothing intrinsically harmful about this imbalance. I certainly don’t believe it shows a conscious bias against women. Nor that it can be explained by the supposition that, philosophy being concerned above all with arguments, women are naturally less adept in the field...


A man's world: a marble statue of Plato at the Academy in Athens. 
Photograph: Alamy

Julian Baggini, philosopher and writer I agree there is little or no conscious discrimination against women in philosophy. But that is not to say there isn’t a great deal of unconscious bias. The puzzle is why this should be stronger in philosophy than in other disciplines. The answer, I think, is to be found in philosophy’s self-image. Philosophers have tended to have an inflated sense of their ability to “follow the argument wherever it leads”, as Plato’s old saw has it. What matters is the argument, not the arguer, which means there is no need even to think about gender or ethnicity. Philosophers have thus felt immune to the distorting effects of gender bias. Logic is gender-neutral, philosophy is logical, ergo philosophy is gender-neutral. I suspect this has led to complacency, a blindness towards all the ways in which, in fact, gender bias does creep in. It is a well-established finding in psychology that believing you are an objective judge actually makes your judgments less objective, and I’m sure philosophy suffers from this. I admit that this explanation for at least part of the under-representation of women in philosophy is somewhat speculative, but I would be interested to hear what you make of it.
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Source: The Guardian  


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