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Thursday, August 30, 2007

Stanford team puts campus on map; wins Google Earth 3-D modeling contest

Recently graduated senior Joseph Bergen and nine other students worked together to map the Stanford campus in 3-D and emerged as one of seven teams to win a contest hosted by Google to create 3-D models of their respective college campuses for the search giant's geographic information feature, Google Earth.


Recently graduated senior Joseph Bergen is more familiar with the architectural intricacies of Stanford's Main Quad than the average observer. After spending about five hours trying to capture every exterior face of the structure on film for a digital 3-D modeling project—snapping nearly 400 pictures—Bergen noticed the subtle differences between the history and math corners, as well as the strange looks from his peers.
Read more...

Related link
Google's 'Build Your Campus in 3D Competition'
Stanford on Google's 3D Warehouse







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Stanford team puts campus on map; wins Google Earth 3-D modeling contest

Recently graduated senior Joseph Bergen and nine other students worked together to map the Stanford campus in 3-D and emerged as one of seven teams to win a contest hosted by Google to create 3-D models of their respective college campuses for the search giant's geographic information feature, Google Earth.


Recently graduated senior Joseph Bergen is more familiar with the architectural intricacies of Stanford's Main Quad than the average observer. After spending about five hours trying to capture every exterior face of the structure on film for a digital 3-D modeling project—snapping nearly 400 pictures—Bergen noticed the subtle differences between the history and math corners, as well as the strange looks from his peers.
Read more...

Related link
Google's 'Build Your Campus in 3D Competition'
Stanford on Google's 3D Warehouse







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Wednesday, August 29, 2007

How Dartmouth Produces Video Podcasts by Dian Schaffhauser


With an $8,000 investment, Dartmouth's Department of Physics and Astronomy has set up the capability to provide video podcasts for courses that enable students to watch lectures they may have missed or that warrant review. Now, said Lab Manager John Largent, the New Hampshire school is exploring how it can make lecture capture available campus-wide.
Up until the summer of 2004, only a single professor in the department was in the practice of making one of his courses available for viewing after class. The media format was videotape, which had to be checked out from the library.


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How Dartmouth Produces Video Podcasts by Dian Schaffhauser


With an $8,000 investment, Dartmouth's Department of Physics and Astronomy has set up the capability to provide video podcasts for courses that enable students to watch lectures they may have missed or that warrant review. Now, said Lab Manager John Largent, the New Hampshire school is exploring how it can make lecture capture available campus-wide.
Up until the summer of 2004, only a single professor in the department was in the practice of making one of his courses available for viewing after class. The media format was videotape, which had to be checked out from the library.


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The latest EDUCAUSE Quarterly


The latest EDUCAUSE Quarterly Volume 30, Number 3, 2007 is now online.


Text Messaging to Improve Social Presence in Online Learning


A pilot study of text messaging explored its usefulness in enhancing social presence and communication in online courses.
Jimmy, an Army private, waiting in a hot and smelly tent West of Baghdad; Molly, a stay-at-home mother, waiting with her baby in a Laundromat for clothes to dry; Jane, a science teacher, waiting for the ferry to arrive; and Keith, a cell phone account executive, waiting for a day of cold calls to begin.
What could these four people possibly have in common? They represent the types of students continuing their education through distance education programs at East Carolina University (ECU). For each of them, accessing course content means connecting to the Internet to receive information presented on a Web-based learning/course management system such as Blackboard, Sakai, or Moodle.




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The latest EDUCAUSE Quarterly


The latest EDUCAUSE Quarterly Volume 30, Number 3, 2007 is now online.


Text Messaging to Improve Social Presence in Online Learning


A pilot study of text messaging explored its usefulness in enhancing social presence and communication in online courses.
Jimmy, an Army private, waiting in a hot and smelly tent West of Baghdad; Molly, a stay-at-home mother, waiting with her baby in a Laundromat for clothes to dry; Jane, a science teacher, waiting for the ferry to arrive; and Keith, a cell phone account executive, waiting for a day of cold calls to begin.
What could these four people possibly have in common? They represent the types of students continuing their education through distance education programs at East Carolina University (ECU). For each of them, accessing course content means connecting to the Internet to receive information presented on a Web-based learning/course management system such as Blackboard, Sakai, or Moodle.




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Tuesday, August 28, 2007

Leveraging multimedia for eLearning by Ruth Clark


Use instructional methods proven to align with natural learning processes
Take a look at this white paper developed by Ruth Clark, author of "e-Learning and the Science of Instruction" and "Efficiency in Learning."

Face-to-face classroom learning versus eLearning
Figure below shows a histogram of the effect sizes from over 300 studies comparing learning from various forms of electronic distance technology to learning in face-to-face classrooms. As you can see, most of the effect sizes fall close to zero, indicating no practical learning differences between a digital and face-to-face delivery. However, in some cases,computer-delivered training resulted in more effective learning than classroom learning, and vice versa.


In this white paper, we’ve looked at some of the most important guidelines for using visuals,audio, text, and interactivity in ways that promote human learning processes.

Related links


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Leveraging multimedia for eLearning by Ruth Clark


Use instructional methods proven to align with natural learning processes
Take a look at this white paper developed by Ruth Clark, author of "e-Learning and the Science of Instruction" and "Efficiency in Learning."

Face-to-face classroom learning versus eLearning
Figure below shows a histogram of the effect sizes from over 300 studies comparing learning from various forms of electronic distance technology to learning in face-to-face classrooms. As you can see, most of the effect sizes fall close to zero, indicating no practical learning differences between a digital and face-to-face delivery. However, in some cases,computer-delivered training resulted in more effective learning than classroom learning, and vice versa.


In this white paper, we’ve looked at some of the most important guidelines for using visuals,audio, text, and interactivity in ways that promote human learning processes.

Related links


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Sunday, August 26, 2007

Learning Outcomes of Blended Learning by Brandon Hall Research


Blended learning is viewed as having better outcomes than both traditional face-to-face instruction and e-learning alone.
According to a survey Brandon Hall Research conducted in March of this year of more than 150 learning professionals, the overwhelming majority of respondents indicated that they believed that a blended learning strategy produced better learning outcomes than either face-to-face training alone or e-learning alone.

Blended Learning — Learning Outcomes vs. Face-to-Face








Blended Learning - Learning Outcomes vs. E-Learning


Read more...


As mentioned earlier in another post, The Real Story: Blended Learning, provides the definitive analysis you need to create and optimize an effective blended learning strategy. This report examines:


  • The instructional design implications of blended learning
  • The benefits that new Web 2.0 technologies can provide to blended learning
  • What learners prefer in terms of training modalities
  • The role of learning management systems in blended learning implementations
  • And much more
Read more...

This report is also available through a subscription to the Brandon Hall Research Library

Related link
The Real Story: Blended Learning.

Source: Brandon Hall Research


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Learning Outcomes of Blended Learning by Brandon Hall Research


Blended learning is viewed as having better outcomes than both traditional face-to-face instruction and e-learning alone.
According to a survey Brandon Hall Research conducted in March of this year of more than 150 learning professionals, the overwhelming majority of respondents indicated that they believed that a blended learning strategy produced better learning outcomes than either face-to-face training alone or e-learning alone.

Blended Learning — Learning Outcomes vs. Face-to-Face








Blended Learning - Learning Outcomes vs. E-Learning


Read more...


As mentioned earlier in another post, The Real Story: Blended Learning, provides the definitive analysis you need to create and optimize an effective blended learning strategy. This report examines:


  • The instructional design implications of blended learning
  • The benefits that new Web 2.0 technologies can provide to blended learning
  • What learners prefer in terms of training modalities
  • The role of learning management systems in blended learning implementations
  • And much more
Read more...

This report is also available through a subscription to the Brandon Hall Research Library

Related link
The Real Story: Blended Learning.

Source: Brandon Hall Research


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Saturday, August 25, 2007

New Executive member of the EDEN Executive Committee


Professor Morten Flate Paulsen, Director of Development, NKI Distance Education, Norway was elected as Member of the EDEN Executive Committee at the Annual General Meeting in Naples.
Morten has got his Doctorate of Education from the Pennsylvania State University and Master of Science in Engineering from the Norwegian Institute of Technology.

Related link

Source: EDEN


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New Executive member of the EDEN Executive Committee


Professor Morten Flate Paulsen, Director of Development, NKI Distance Education, Norway was elected as Member of the EDEN Executive Committee at the Annual General Meeting in Naples.
Morten has got his Doctorate of Education from the Pennsylvania State University and Master of Science in Engineering from the Norwegian Institute of Technology.

Related link

Source: EDEN


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Executive Summary HELIOS report 2007

Is e-Learning contributing to Innovation of the European Society?

Take a look at some highlights on this issue by downloading the Executive Summary of the HELIOS Yearly Report 2007 "e-Learning for Innovation".
Download the Executive Summary HELIOS report 2007

The concepts and ideas above are outlined are expanded in the HELIOS Yearly Report 2007, which is articulated as follows:

  • Chapter 2 – e-Learning Contribution to European Policy Objectives presents the main outcomes of the HELIOS thematic analysis on the extent to which e-Learning contributes to: increasing access to learning, improving employability, fostering personal development and citizenship, supporting internationalisation and innovation of Education and Training systems, fostering organisational change. .
  • Chapter 3 – e-Learning for Innovation presents the state of development of e-Learning in Europe through the analysis of the evolving ‘e-Learning territories’, the concept introduced in the HELIOS Yearly Report 2006 to define the combinations of different aims, methods, learning patrimonies and value orientation that - better than traditional education and training sectors - may help to understand the different speed and different evolution paths of ICT for learning. .
  • Chapter 4 – Foresight on e-Learning Developments - In and around the 2.0 (R-) Evolution provides an insight on the most significant expected trends in e-Learning developments for the years to come. .
    Chapter 5 – In the Agenda presents the concluding remarks resulting from the HELIOS study on e-Learning developments in Europe in 2006/2007. .
  • Chapter 6 – Building the European Observatory presents the main conclusions and recommendations in view of a European Observatory on e-Learning for innovation.

The HELIOS Yearly Report 2007 is the result of two years of research work coordinated by the HELIOS consortium and involving major EU eLearning actors.
"e-Learning for Innovation" is now available to order









Source:
HELIOS and EDEN


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Executive Summary HELIOS report 2007

Is e-Learning contributing to Innovation of the European Society?

Take a look at some highlights on this issue by downloading the Executive Summary of the HELIOS Yearly Report 2007 "e-Learning for Innovation".
Download the Executive Summary HELIOS report 2007

The concepts and ideas above are outlined are expanded in the HELIOS Yearly Report 2007, which is articulated as follows:

  • Chapter 2 – e-Learning Contribution to European Policy Objectives presents the main outcomes of the HELIOS thematic analysis on the extent to which e-Learning contributes to: increasing access to learning, improving employability, fostering personal development and citizenship, supporting internationalisation and innovation of Education and Training systems, fostering organisational change. .
  • Chapter 3 – e-Learning for Innovation presents the state of development of e-Learning in Europe through the analysis of the evolving ‘e-Learning territories’, the concept introduced in the HELIOS Yearly Report 2006 to define the combinations of different aims, methods, learning patrimonies and value orientation that - better than traditional education and training sectors - may help to understand the different speed and different evolution paths of ICT for learning. .
  • Chapter 4 – Foresight on e-Learning Developments - In and around the 2.0 (R-) Evolution provides an insight on the most significant expected trends in e-Learning developments for the years to come. .
    Chapter 5 – In the Agenda presents the concluding remarks resulting from the HELIOS study on e-Learning developments in Europe in 2006/2007. .
  • Chapter 6 – Building the European Observatory presents the main conclusions and recommendations in view of a European Observatory on e-Learning for innovation.

The HELIOS Yearly Report 2007 is the result of two years of research work coordinated by the HELIOS consortium and involving major EU eLearning actors.
"e-Learning for Innovation" is now available to order









Source:
HELIOS and EDEN


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

LearningPortal introduction - new eLearning Video Site


Bill Hornbeck has been in touch to reminds us about the launch of the LearningPortal.
We are very early stage and have recently initiated a “soft launch” of LearningPortal.com without any announcements or fanfare while we add new presentations and work out some preliminaries in the Beta stage.
We are adding quality presentations in the Training and eLearning sector now and are seeking ‘Charter’ Content Owners to add their presentations to the mix.
LearningPortal serves as an integrator and aggregator of digital media knowledge-based content for online, on-time and anytime distribution of audio and video Training and eLearning presentations that are distributed in the form of streaming media and digital downloads.
Check it out.



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LearningPortal introduction - new eLearning Video Site


Bill Hornbeck has been in touch to reminds us about the launch of the LearningPortal.
We are very early stage and have recently initiated a “soft launch” of LearningPortal.com without any announcements or fanfare while we add new presentations and work out some preliminaries in the Beta stage.
We are adding quality presentations in the Training and eLearning sector now and are seeking ‘Charter’ Content Owners to add their presentations to the mix.
LearningPortal serves as an integrator and aggregator of digital media knowledge-based content for online, on-time and anytime distribution of audio and video Training and eLearning presentations that are distributed in the form of streaming media and digital downloads.
Check it out.



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Thursday, August 23, 2007

Schools combat cheating one student at a time by Sharon Strauss

Local educators say students aren’t cheating more than in the past, but there’s a modern technological twist to the way they sneak in exam answers or plagiarize term papers




Photo Illustration Greg Kreller


Parents should be aware of a school’s policy for electronic devices and Internet usage, especially in regard to cheating. Some Canyon County schools even have an all-out ban on such things as cell phones, iPods and MP3 players, partly because of the role the gadgets play in cheating.
Local principals emphasize that the majority of students are honest in academics, and instances of catching a student cheating are rare. That’s partly because of electronics bans in class. At Caldwell High, a blanket no-use policy is in effect for cell phones, although students are allowed to use iPods and MP3 players during their lunch period.
Vallivue High has a total ban on electronic devices on campus.
Read more...




Source:
Idaho Press-Tribune


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Schools combat cheating one student at a time by Sharon Strauss

Local educators say students aren’t cheating more than in the past, but there’s a modern technological twist to the way they sneak in exam answers or plagiarize term papers




Photo Illustration Greg Kreller


Parents should be aware of a school’s policy for electronic devices and Internet usage, especially in regard to cheating. Some Canyon County schools even have an all-out ban on such things as cell phones, iPods and MP3 players, partly because of the role the gadgets play in cheating.
Local principals emphasize that the majority of students are honest in academics, and instances of catching a student cheating are rare. That’s partly because of electronics bans in class. At Caldwell High, a blanket no-use policy is in effect for cell phones, although students are allowed to use iPods and MP3 players during their lunch period.
Vallivue High has a total ban on electronic devices on campus.
Read more...




Source:
Idaho Press-Tribune


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Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Educators assess iPhones for instruction


Apple's iPhone made quite a splash when it debuted earlier this summer--and educators, too, are intrigued by the device. As new applications emerge that can run on the iPhone, some of which specifically target education, schools are considering whether the iPhone can be an effective classroom tool.
Techies and trendsetters, Apple fans and cell-phone enthusiasts have all been buzzing about Apple's new iPhone. Many educators, too, are intrigued by this new technology and are weighing its potential impact in schools.
While some educators applaud the iPhone's revolutionary interface and its access to more than 300 applications, others say its high cost and lack of certain key features--such as a video camera--will keep them from investing in the device for their classrooms, at least for now.
Fueling schools' interest in the iPhone is the emergence of education-specific applications for the device.
In June, Apple announced that the iPhone would support third-party Web 2.0 applications. Soon thereafter, Software MacKiev--a maker of software for the Macintosh platform, such as World Book, HyperStudio, and 3-D Weather Globe and Atlas--became one of the first companies to develop an educational application for the iPhone, releasing This Day in History. The software tool is based on the widget by the same name included with the 2007 World Book Multimedia Encyclopedia, and it lists historical events that correspond to each day's calendar date. Best of all, it's available free of charge for iPhone users.





Source: eSchool News


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Educators assess iPhones for instruction


Apple's iPhone made quite a splash when it debuted earlier this summer--and educators, too, are intrigued by the device. As new applications emerge that can run on the iPhone, some of which specifically target education, schools are considering whether the iPhone can be an effective classroom tool.
Techies and trendsetters, Apple fans and cell-phone enthusiasts have all been buzzing about Apple's new iPhone. Many educators, too, are intrigued by this new technology and are weighing its potential impact in schools.
While some educators applaud the iPhone's revolutionary interface and its access to more than 300 applications, others say its high cost and lack of certain key features--such as a video camera--will keep them from investing in the device for their classrooms, at least for now.
Fueling schools' interest in the iPhone is the emergence of education-specific applications for the device.
In June, Apple announced that the iPhone would support third-party Web 2.0 applications. Soon thereafter, Software MacKiev--a maker of software for the Macintosh platform, such as World Book, HyperStudio, and 3-D Weather Globe and Atlas--became one of the first companies to develop an educational application for the iPhone, releasing This Day in History. The software tool is based on the widget by the same name included with the 2007 World Book Multimedia Encyclopedia, and it lists historical events that correspond to each day's calendar date. Best of all, it's available free of charge for iPhone users.





Source: eSchool News


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Monday, August 20, 2007

Creating & Connecting: Research and Guidelines on Online Social and Educational Networking


Ninety-six percent of U.S. students ages 9 to 17 who have internet access use social-networking technology to connect with their peers, and one of their most common topics of discussion is education, according to a new survey.
A remarkable 96% of students with online access report that they have ever used some form of social networking technology, according to a new study from the National School Boards Association. That includes activities such as text messaging, chatting and blogging as well as participating in online communities such as Facebook or sites designed specifically for younger children, such as Webkins.
More than 70% say that they use social networking tools at least once a week. The 9-to 17-year-olds surveyed spent almost as much time using social networking services and Web sites as they spent watching television, about 9 hours a week online, compared to 10 hours a week watching television. And unlike TV, these teens and tweens are behaving creatively when online, uploading photos or artwork they have created or videos they have made. And it's not just all music and video sharing. Nearly 60% of online students report discussing education-related topics such as college or college planning, learning outside of school, and careers. And 50%of online students say they talk specifically about schoolwork.
The report, "Creating & Connecting: Research and Guidelines on Online Social and Educational Networking," is based on three surveys: an online survey of nearly 1,300 9- to 17-year-olds, an online survey of more than 1,000 parents, and telephone interviews with 250 school districts leaders who make decisions on Internet policy.




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Creating & Connecting: Research and Guidelines on Online Social and Educational Networking


Ninety-six percent of U.S. students ages 9 to 17 who have internet access use social-networking technology to connect with their peers, and one of their most common topics of discussion is education, according to a new survey.
A remarkable 96% of students with online access report that they have ever used some form of social networking technology, according to a new study from the National School Boards Association. That includes activities such as text messaging, chatting and blogging as well as participating in online communities such as Facebook or sites designed specifically for younger children, such as Webkins.
More than 70% say that they use social networking tools at least once a week. The 9-to 17-year-olds surveyed spent almost as much time using social networking services and Web sites as they spent watching television, about 9 hours a week online, compared to 10 hours a week watching television. And unlike TV, these teens and tweens are behaving creatively when online, uploading photos or artwork they have created or videos they have made. And it's not just all music and video sharing. Nearly 60% of online students report discussing education-related topics such as college or college planning, learning outside of school, and careers. And 50%of online students say they talk specifically about schoolwork.
The report, "Creating & Connecting: Research and Guidelines on Online Social and Educational Networking," is based on three surveys: an online survey of nearly 1,300 9- to 17-year-olds, an online survey of more than 1,000 parents, and telephone interviews with 250 school districts leaders who make decisions on Internet policy.




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