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Monday, October 10, 2016

New eBook - AR, VR, and Enhanced Realities: Seven Perspectives on the Potential and Risks for Learning | The eLearning Guild


The eLearning Guild’s new free eBook, AR, VR, and Enhanced Realities: Seven Perspectives on the Potential and Risks for Learning, offers insights on these technologies from seven noted experts in the field.

Download AR, VR, and Enhanced Realities: Seven Perspectives on the Potential and Risks for Learning

Virtual, augmented, and enhanced reality applications are just about ready to explode into the consumer market. The inevitable explosion will mainstream this technology and change how we look at content forever, opening new opportunities for entertainment and also for how we connect, share, and learn.

Topics include:
  • Joe Ganci and Sherry Larson on New Technologies: Do They Really Change Learning Strategies?
  • David Kelly on Enhanced Realities: An Opportunity to Avoid the Mistakes of the Past
  • Chad Udell on Let the Use Case Drive What Gets Augmented—Not the Other Way Around
  • Alexander Salas on Augmented Reality: An Augmented Perspective
  • Koreen Pagano on Virtual Reality Will Be the Perfect Immersive Learning Environment
  • John O’Hare on Will VR Succeed? Viewpoint from Within a Large Corporation
  • Ishai Jacob on Will VR Succeed? Viewpoint from Running a VR Start-up
For this eBook, we reached out to members of the eLearning Guild community who are already exploring the possibilities of these emerging technologies. What follows is a collection of seven different perspectives examining the possibilities and implications that virtual, augmented, and mixed reality applications have for learning and performance.

Download AR, VR, and Enhanced Realities: Seven Perspectives on the Potential and Risks for Learning for free today.

Source: The eLearning Guild


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2 comments:

Nikos Andriotis said...

For me the most interesting thing about it actual effectiveness of contextualization of eLearning. At face value, it has to be great - every experience is augmented, extended thus making an opportunity to learn something, thanks to a net of relations - an experience of an owl is related an encyclopedia entry about an owl and so on and so on.

I'm keeping an eye on research in this matter - does this hypothetically valid learning strategy actually work?

Helge Scherlund said...

Hi Nikos Andriotis,

Thank you for dropping by.
I appreciate your comment.

/Helge