Translate into a different language

Sunday, June 23, 2013

Articles released by The Electronic Journal of e-Learning (EJEL)

I hope you would like to read these three interesting articles released by The Electronic Journal of e-Learning (EJEL)


EJEL Editor Roy Williams writes, "The articles in this issue demonstrate the widening range of possibilities for elearning". 

The technologies continue to develop and change, and issues of adoption and innovation persist. Like any other technologies, e-learning hardware and software is best used when it is introduced to solve a real problem which has been carefully thought through. The articles show that there is tremendous promise and opportunity, but there are no quick fixes, and no one-size-fits all solutions.

Using Action Research to Investigate Social Networking Technologies   
University of Salford, School of the Built Environment, Centre for Construction Innovation,
Salford, UK

Abstract
This article outlines the first cycle of an Action Research (AR) investigation into why professional learners are not using the Social Networking Technologies (SNTs) of their bespoke website. 
It presents the rationale of how this study came about, the ontological and epistemological stance of the authors and how this led to the particular choice of contextual based AR enquiry. This article includes reference to some of the most salient literature on AR and discusses the ethical and practical constraints that surround this type of research. The first cycle of AR findings are presented and identify a number of key areas where the website is failing; including a lack of speed in responding to learner queries, negative user perceptions of not ‘owning’ the website, a lack of synchronous private chat rooms, user time constraints, negative user experiences of not being online simultaneously and of a broader failure in unifying school and university websites to promote wider social networking opportunities. In response to these findings, this article puts forward a table which includes an identification of the issues and themes, the methods utilised and how the findings were derived, reflections upon what they indicate, and an action strategy for implementation alongside questions for future research. 
This article concludes by stating that the action plan will be implemented and assessed in the next cycle of AR which is viewed by the authors as being part of a contextually valid, lifelong AR spiral process.

A Case Study on the Adoption and use of Synchronous Virtual Classrooms 
Watson School of Education, University of North Carolina, Wilmington, North Carolina
USA

Abstract
This is a case study of faculty adoption and use of Horizon Wimba Virtual Classroom in online courses at a Southeastern University in the United States.. 
The purpose of this case study was to explore faculty adoption and use of Horizon Wimba in their online courses. This inquiry is based on Yen et al. (2010) adoption factors (organizational, social, personal and technological) and the features of the virtual classroom. The research questions are 1) What factors and features influence faculty adoption of the Wimba Virtual Classroom? 2) How do faculty rate the Wimba Virtual Classroom using the characteristics of innovation? 3) How do faculty classify themselves using Roger’s model of diffusion of innovation? 4) How do faculty use the Wimba Virtual Classroom in their teaching? Roger’s diffusion of innovation was used as the theoretical framework for faculty adoption of virtual classroom. In the Fall of 2010, faculty were surveyed and interviewed about their decision to adopt and use Wimba. 
This case study provides meaningful information for administrators interested in promoting technology enhanced learning on their campuses and for faculty considering adoption.

The Evolution of e‑Learning in the Context of 3D Virtual Worlds 
Theodore Kotsilieris1 and Nikoletta Dimopoulou2
1Department of Health & Welfare Units Administration, Technological Educational
Institute of Kalamata, Kalamata, Greece
2West-Attiki Region, Athens, Greece

Abstract
Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) offer new approaches towards knowledge acquisition and collaboration through distance learning processes. Web-based Learning Management Systems (LMS) have transformed the way that education is conducted nowadays. 
At the same time, the adoption of Virtual Worlds in the educational process is of great importance, not only for the researchers in the field of Web-based Education, but also for the educational community that is interested in applying ICT in education. The main motivation for studying the potential of Virtual Worlds applications in education stems from the capabilities they offer to create a cyberspace where users can interact with other participants (through their avatars) or objects, creating new experiences that are not often feasible in the real world.
Within this context, the fundamentals of learning theories have to be analyzed, in order to study their impact on e-learning and Virtual Learning Environments design. 
The currently available Virtual-World platforms are being presented and qualitatively assessed. Subsequently we focus on Sloodle, which bridges the characteristics of the Moodle LMS with the Open Simulator 3D virtual world functionality. 

Enjoy Your Reading!

Source:The Electronic Journal of e-Learning (EJEL) 


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Articles released by The Electronic Journal of e-Learning (EJEL)

I hope you would like to read these three interesting articles released by The Electronic Journal of e-Learning (EJEL)


EJEL Editor Roy Williams writes, "The articles in this issue demonstrate the widening range of possibilities for elearning". 

The technologies continue to develop and change, and issues of adoption and innovation persist. Like any other technologies, e-learning hardware and software is best used when it is introduced to solve a real problem which has been carefully thought through. The articles show that there is tremendous promise and opportunity, but there are no quick fixes, and no one-size-fits all solutions.

Using Action Research to Investigate Social Networking Technologies   
University of Salford, School of the Built Environment, Centre for Construction Innovation,
Salford, UK

Abstract
This article outlines the first cycle of an Action Research (AR) investigation into why professional learners are not using the Social Networking Technologies (SNTs) of their bespoke website. 
It presents the rationale of how this study came about, the ontological and epistemological stance of the authors and how this led to the particular choice of contextual based AR enquiry. This article includes reference to some of the most salient literature on AR and discusses the ethical and practical constraints that surround this type of research. The first cycle of AR findings are presented and identify a number of key areas where the website is failing; including a lack of speed in responding to learner queries, negative user perceptions of not ‘owning’ the website, a lack of synchronous private chat rooms, user time constraints, negative user experiences of not being online simultaneously and of a broader failure in unifying school and university websites to promote wider social networking opportunities. In response to these findings, this article puts forward a table which includes an identification of the issues and themes, the methods utilised and how the findings were derived, reflections upon what they indicate, and an action strategy for implementation alongside questions for future research. 
This article concludes by stating that the action plan will be implemented and assessed in the next cycle of AR which is viewed by the authors as being part of a contextually valid, lifelong AR spiral process.

A Case Study on the Adoption and use of Synchronous Virtual Classrooms 
Watson School of Education, University of North Carolina, Wilmington, North Carolina
USA

Abstract
This is a case study of faculty adoption and use of Horizon Wimba Virtual Classroom in online courses at a Southeastern University in the United States.. 
The purpose of this case study was to explore faculty adoption and use of Horizon Wimba in their online courses. This inquiry is based on Yen et al. (2010) adoption factors (organizational, social, personal and technological) and the features of the virtual classroom. The research questions are 1) What factors and features influence faculty adoption of the Wimba Virtual Classroom? 2) How do faculty rate the Wimba Virtual Classroom using the characteristics of innovation? 3) How do faculty classify themselves using Roger’s model of diffusion of innovation? 4) How do faculty use the Wimba Virtual Classroom in their teaching? Roger’s diffusion of innovation was used as the theoretical framework for faculty adoption of virtual classroom. In the Fall of 2010, faculty were surveyed and interviewed about their decision to adopt and use Wimba. 
This case study provides meaningful information for administrators interested in promoting technology enhanced learning on their campuses and for faculty considering adoption.

The Evolution of e‑Learning in the Context of 3D Virtual Worlds 
Theodore Kotsilieris1 and Nikoletta Dimopoulou2
1Department of Health & Welfare Units Administration, Technological Educational
Institute of Kalamata, Kalamata, Greece
2West-Attiki Region, Athens, Greece

Abstract
Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) offer new approaches towards knowledge acquisition and collaboration through distance learning processes. Web-based Learning Management Systems (LMS) have transformed the way that education is conducted nowadays. 
At the same time, the adoption of Virtual Worlds in the educational process is of great importance, not only for the researchers in the field of Web-based Education, but also for the educational community that is interested in applying ICT in education. The main motivation for studying the potential of Virtual Worlds applications in education stems from the capabilities they offer to create a cyberspace where users can interact with other participants (through their avatars) or objects, creating new experiences that are not often feasible in the real world.
Within this context, the fundamentals of learning theories have to be analyzed, in order to study their impact on e-learning and Virtual Learning Environments design. 
The currently available Virtual-World platforms are being presented and qualitatively assessed. Subsequently we focus on Sloodle, which bridges the characteristics of the Moodle LMS with the Open Simulator 3D virtual world functionality. 

Enjoy Your Reading!

Source:The Electronic Journal of e-Learning (EJEL) 


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Saturday, June 22, 2013

Class Tech Tips: Math vs Zombies for Fluency

Math vs. Zombiesimage, "There are lots of apps for math fluency but has to be one of the most engaging ones! Students use fanatics facts to turn zombies back to people in this fast moving, sharply illustrated math fluency game. It’s a great app for changing up your skill and drill flashcard routine!", writes Monica Burns.

http://www.taptolearn.com/MathVsZombies.html

This app is featured on my Common Core Math Apps List #1

About Monica Burns   

She is a fifth grade teacher in a 1:1 iPad classroom. Visit her website at classtechtips.com for creative education technology tips and technology lesson plans aligned to the Common Core Standards. 

Source: TL Advisor Blog and TapToLearn


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Class Tech Tips: Math vs Zombies for Fluency

Math vs. Zombiesimage, "There are lots of apps for math fluency but has to be one of the most engaging ones! Students use fanatics facts to turn zombies back to people in this fast moving, sharply illustrated math fluency game. It’s a great app for changing up your skill and drill flashcard routine!", writes Monica Burns.

http://www.taptolearn.com/MathVsZombies.html

This app is featured on my Common Core Math Apps List #1

About Monica Burns   

She is a fifth grade teacher in a 1:1 iPad classroom. Visit her website at classtechtips.com for creative education technology tips and technology lesson plans aligned to the Common Core Standards. 

Source: TL Advisor Blog and TapToLearn


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Upcoming Events Brandon Hall Group

Join Brandon Hall Group for their upcoming events


 For detailed descriptions of their webinars visit their website here 
Jul 11
The Role of Learning in Global Talent Management
David Wentworth, Brandon Hall Group
Alex Poulos, NetDimensions



Jul 23
Thinking of Replacing Your LMS?David Wentworth, Brandon Hall Group
Shruti Kala, Saba

Learn from the best in their 30 minute forums featuring winners of the Brandon Hall Group Excellence Awards.
 Jul 22
 Building a World-Class Sales Enablement Program:Fast, Great and AffordableClaude Werder, Brandon Hall Group
Dave Stachura, AMD



Aug 5
Peer-to-Peer Coaching for an Individualized Leadership ProgramRachel Cooke, Brandon Hall Group
Clare Norman, Accenture



Aug 19
Collaborative Workflow Enables Innovative Content Delivery at AAAClaude Werder, Brandon Hall Group
Shane Verheyen, AAA
Sean Lee, AAA




Source: Brandon Hall Group


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Upcoming Events Brandon Hall Group

Join Brandon Hall Group for their upcoming events


 For detailed descriptions of their webinars visit their website here 
Jul 11
The Role of Learning in Global Talent Management
David Wentworth, Brandon Hall Group
Alex Poulos, NetDimensions



Jul 23
Thinking of Replacing Your LMS?David Wentworth, Brandon Hall Group
Shruti Kala, Saba

Learn from the best in their 30 minute forums featuring winners of the Brandon Hall Group Excellence Awards.
 Jul 22
 Building a World-Class Sales Enablement Program:Fast, Great and AffordableClaude Werder, Brandon Hall Group
Dave Stachura, AMD



Aug 5
Peer-to-Peer Coaching for an Individualized Leadership ProgramRachel Cooke, Brandon Hall Group
Clare Norman, Accenture



Aug 19
Collaborative Workflow Enables Innovative Content Delivery at AAAClaude Werder, Brandon Hall Group
Shane Verheyen, AAA
Sean Lee, AAA




Source: Brandon Hall Group


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Recommended Book: Academic Conversations - Classroom Talk that Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings


Academic Conversations gives you the structures you need to foster quality conversations in language arts, social studies, science, and other subjects. Students will develop critical skills for exploring an important question, idea, or topic. 
 
http://www.stenhouse.com/emags/0884-11/index.html

Stenhouse Publishers writes, "Where would we be without conversation? Throughout history, conversations have allowed us to see different perspectives, build ideas, and solve problems. Conversations, particularly those referred to in this book as academic conversations, push students to think and learn in lasting ways".
Where would we be without conversation? Throughout history, conversations have allowed us to see different perspectives, build ideas, and solve problems. Conversations, particularly those referred to in this book as academic conversations, push students to think and learn in lasting ways. - See more at: http://www.stenhouse.com/shop/pc/viewPrd.asp?idProduct=9533#sthash.ytsrVh5n.dpuf

To address these challenges, authors Jeff Zwiers and Marie Crawford have identified five core communication skills to help students hold productive academic conversations across content areas.
These skills include: elaborating and clarifying, supporting ideas with evidence, building on and/or challenging ideas, paraphrasing, and synthesizing. This book shows teachers how to weave the cultivation of academic conversation skills and conversations into current teaching approaches.

More specifically, it describes how to use conversations to build the following:
  • Academic vocabulary and grammar 
  • Critical thinking skills such as persuasion, interpretation, consideration of multiple perspectives, evaluation, and application 
  • Literacy skills such as questioning, predicting, connecting to prior knowledge, and summarizing
  • Complex and abstract essential understandings in content areas such as adaptation, human nature, bias, conservation of mass, energy, gravity, irony, democracy, greed, and more 
  • An academic classroom environment brimming with respect for others' ideas, equity of voice, engagement, and mutual support  
About the Authors
Marie Crawford is an assistant principal at Central Middle School in the San Carlos School District.  
Read more...    

Jeff Zwiers teaches in the Stanford Teaching Education Program and works for Stanford's Center to Support Excellence in Teaching.  
Read more...

Source: EdWeek Update and Stenhouse Publishers


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Recommended Book: Academic Conversations - Classroom Talk that Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings


Academic Conversations gives you the structures you need to foster quality conversations in language arts, social studies, science, and other subjects. Students will develop critical skills for exploring an important question, idea, or topic. 
 
http://www.stenhouse.com/emags/0884-11/index.html

Stenhouse Publishers writes, "Where would we be without conversation? Throughout history, conversations have allowed us to see different perspectives, build ideas, and solve problems. Conversations, particularly those referred to in this book as academic conversations, push students to think and learn in lasting ways".
Where would we be without conversation? Throughout history, conversations have allowed us to see different perspectives, build ideas, and solve problems. Conversations, particularly those referred to in this book as academic conversations, push students to think and learn in lasting ways. - See more at: http://www.stenhouse.com/shop/pc/viewPrd.asp?idProduct=9533#sthash.ytsrVh5n.dpuf

To address these challenges, authors Jeff Zwiers and Marie Crawford have identified five core communication skills to help students hold productive academic conversations across content areas.
These skills include: elaborating and clarifying, supporting ideas with evidence, building on and/or challenging ideas, paraphrasing, and synthesizing. This book shows teachers how to weave the cultivation of academic conversation skills and conversations into current teaching approaches.

More specifically, it describes how to use conversations to build the following:
  • Academic vocabulary and grammar 
  • Critical thinking skills such as persuasion, interpretation, consideration of multiple perspectives, evaluation, and application 
  • Literacy skills such as questioning, predicting, connecting to prior knowledge, and summarizing
  • Complex and abstract essential understandings in content areas such as adaptation, human nature, bias, conservation of mass, energy, gravity, irony, democracy, greed, and more 
  • An academic classroom environment brimming with respect for others' ideas, equity of voice, engagement, and mutual support  
About the Authors
Marie Crawford is an assistant principal at Central Middle School in the San Carlos School District.  
Read more...    

Jeff Zwiers teaches in the Stanford Teaching Education Program and works for Stanford's Center to Support Excellence in Teaching.  
Read more...

Source: EdWeek Update and Stenhouse Publishers


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Flexible Learning handbook available for download now!

The new course handbook has been released for ACS Distance Education for 2013. The handbook introduces our comprehensive range of courses. With over 400 distance education courses covering such a wide array of topics, this handbook is an essential compendium for anyone interested in further studying.

Download the Handbook (PDF)

Some of the areas that ACS Distance Education courses include are gardening, horticulture, environmental studies, agriculture, psychology, health, leisure and fitness, animal care, science and business. Our distance courses are flexible to suit our students’ busy lifestyles, and our courses can be taken online, via correspondence or e-learning. 
Download your freeelectronic copy of the course handbook  

About ACS Distance Education 


Our courses are the result of continuous input from tutors, students and industry over a period of more than 25 years. The input has come from formal channels (e.g. advisory committees, industry reports, student and employer surveys, etc), and informally, by alterations/improvements being made to course notes whenever an improvement is required.

Established in 1979, ACS Distance Education is a leading Australian Distance Education provider which offers over 400 courses via correspondence, online or on CD. The Institution has offices in Australia and the United Kingdom, and ACS courses are delivered worldwide through our network of affiliates. The ACS head office is located on the Gold Coast.
ACS has educated thousands of full and part-time students, many of whom have gone on to successful employment, both in industry or in their own businesses. Others have used their courses to develop a hobby, or simply broaden their general education. We currently have over 3000 students enrolled from Australia and around the world. The school employs staff in three states of Australia, plus the U.K. and New Zealand. As such our courses and service have a truly global focus. The courses have been developed with strong industry input from around the world and are continually updated on the basis of surveys undertaken by both current students and graduates every month of the year.

The school holds high the ideals of practical education, emphasising in all courses those things which are relevant to "real life". Courses offered cater for hobby interest through to formal training in industry and the professions.

Read more...


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Flexible Learning handbook available for download now!

The new course handbook has been released for ACS Distance Education for 2013. The handbook introduces our comprehensive range of courses. With over 400 distance education courses covering such a wide array of topics, this handbook is an essential compendium for anyone interested in further studying.

Download the Handbook (PDF)

Some of the areas that ACS Distance Education courses include are gardening, horticulture, environmental studies, agriculture, psychology, health, leisure and fitness, animal care, science and business. Our distance courses are flexible to suit our students’ busy lifestyles, and our courses can be taken online, via correspondence or e-learning. 
Download your freeelectronic copy of the course handbook  

About ACS Distance Education 


Our courses are the result of continuous input from tutors, students and industry over a period of more than 25 years. The input has come from formal channels (e.g. advisory committees, industry reports, student and employer surveys, etc), and informally, by alterations/improvements being made to course notes whenever an improvement is required.

Established in 1979, ACS Distance Education is a leading Australian Distance Education provider which offers over 400 courses via correspondence, online or on CD. The Institution has offices in Australia and the United Kingdom, and ACS courses are delivered worldwide through our network of affiliates. The ACS head office is located on the Gold Coast.
ACS has educated thousands of full and part-time students, many of whom have gone on to successful employment, both in industry or in their own businesses. Others have used their courses to develop a hobby, or simply broaden their general education. We currently have over 3000 students enrolled from Australia and around the world. The school employs staff in three states of Australia, plus the U.K. and New Zealand. As such our courses and service have a truly global focus. The courses have been developed with strong industry input from around the world and are continually updated on the basis of surveys undertaken by both current students and graduates every month of the year.

The school holds high the ideals of practical education, emphasising in all courses those things which are relevant to "real life". Courses offered cater for hobby interest through to formal training in industry and the professions.

Read more...


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

Monday, June 17, 2013

How to Choose the Right Learning Management System by Katie Ash

Katie Ash writes, "Choosing a learning management system is one of the most costly and time-consuming decisions schools or districts must make as they expand their technological infrastructures".

Photo: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

An LMS is a robust piece of software that provides an online portal for classrooms, serving administrative functions for educators and allowing students to view assignments, grades, and learning materials. Some can be used to deliver entire courses. Once an LMS is in place, it can be difficult and expensive to switch to a different one. That's why making sure it's a good fit initially is crucial.

Ed-tech experts say many schools and districts don't have a good understanding, however, of how to choose and evaluate the different systems available. Several experts offer these suggestions for how to do it right: 

1. Start by figuring out what you want from your learning management system and how it fits into the overall teaching and learning structure of your school or district. 

"You really need to be having a discussion about your overall program goals," says John Watson, the founder of the Durango, Colo.-based Evergreen Education Group, which conducts research on the use of technology in schools. "The LMS decision has to be tied to your content choices and to the devices that students are going to be accessing the materials with."

Many LMS companies boast a dizzying array of features, says Watson, so it's important to enter the discussion with an idea of what students, teachers, and administrators need from the system. He groups options into three categories—don't need, nice-to-have, and must-have—to narrow the choices and avoid paying for features that aren't needed or won't be used.

Kristy Murray, the director of the Advanced Distributed Learning Initiative, agrees. The initiative, which is run by the U.S. Department of Defense, is charged with prototyping and testing the latest learning technologies. 

"Sometimes you may get more bells and whistles with more money, but you may not need more bells and whistles," Murray says. "The most important thing you can do is sit down with your team and identify the requirements for your particular case." In some instances, a simpler, lightweight LMS may be more functional and easier to use than a complex, sophisticated system, she says. 

Peter Berking, the instructional systems designer for the Advanced Distributed Learning Initiative, and co-author of the paper "Choosing a Learning Management SystemRequires Adobe Acrobat Reader," says it's important to evaluate whether your school or district even needs an LMS. 

"You may have your heart set on it, but a Web portal or content repository ... could do just fine," he says. Berking also suggests looking into partnering with other schools or districts to piggyback on an existing LMS, which could provide cost savings. 

In fact, definitions of what an LMS is and should be able to do vary widely from district to district, says Themistocles Sparangis, the chief technology officer for the 670,000-student Los Angeles school district, which is preparing a request for proposals, or RFP, for a new system. (The district currently uses the open source LMS Moodle.) 

"You have to define [what an LMS is] before you can select it," he says. "Your vendors are going to try to define [an LMS] within their product line, but I think K-12 is still struggling to figure out what it is."
Read more..


Related links 
7 Things You Should Know About Personal Learning Environments
7 Things You Should Know About LMS Evaluation 
7 Things You Should Know About LMS Alternatives
 
Source: Education Week


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

How to Choose the Right Learning Management System by Katie Ash

Katie Ash writes, "Choosing a learning management system is one of the most costly and time-consuming decisions schools or districts must make as they expand their technological infrastructures".

Photo: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

An LMS is a robust piece of software that provides an online portal for classrooms, serving administrative functions for educators and allowing students to view assignments, grades, and learning materials. Some can be used to deliver entire courses. Once an LMS is in place, it can be difficult and expensive to switch to a different one. That's why making sure it's a good fit initially is crucial.

Ed-tech experts say many schools and districts don't have a good understanding, however, of how to choose and evaluate the different systems available. Several experts offer these suggestions for how to do it right: 

1. Start by figuring out what you want from your learning management system and how it fits into the overall teaching and learning structure of your school or district. 

"You really need to be having a discussion about your overall program goals," says John Watson, the founder of the Durango, Colo.-based Evergreen Education Group, which conducts research on the use of technology in schools. "The LMS decision has to be tied to your content choices and to the devices that students are going to be accessing the materials with."

Many LMS companies boast a dizzying array of features, says Watson, so it's important to enter the discussion with an idea of what students, teachers, and administrators need from the system. He groups options into three categories—don't need, nice-to-have, and must-have—to narrow the choices and avoid paying for features that aren't needed or won't be used.

Kristy Murray, the director of the Advanced Distributed Learning Initiative, agrees. The initiative, which is run by the U.S. Department of Defense, is charged with prototyping and testing the latest learning technologies. 

"Sometimes you may get more bells and whistles with more money, but you may not need more bells and whistles," Murray says. "The most important thing you can do is sit down with your team and identify the requirements for your particular case." In some instances, a simpler, lightweight LMS may be more functional and easier to use than a complex, sophisticated system, she says. 

Peter Berking, the instructional systems designer for the Advanced Distributed Learning Initiative, and co-author of the paper "Choosing a Learning Management SystemRequires Adobe Acrobat Reader," says it's important to evaluate whether your school or district even needs an LMS. 

"You may have your heart set on it, but a Web portal or content repository ... could do just fine," he says. Berking also suggests looking into partnering with other schools or districts to piggyback on an existing LMS, which could provide cost savings. 

In fact, definitions of what an LMS is and should be able to do vary widely from district to district, says Themistocles Sparangis, the chief technology officer for the 670,000-student Los Angeles school district, which is preparing a request for proposals, or RFP, for a new system. (The district currently uses the open source LMS Moodle.) 

"You have to define [what an LMS is] before you can select it," he says. "Your vendors are going to try to define [an LMS] within their product line, but I think K-12 is still struggling to figure out what it is."
Read more..


Related links 
7 Things You Should Know About Personal Learning Environments
7 Things You Should Know About LMS Evaluation 
7 Things You Should Know About LMS Alternatives
 
Source: Education Week


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

PowerMyLearning offers free, high-quality resources to support Common Core instruction

Developed by the nonprofit organization CFY, PowerMyLearning is a free online platform for K-12 students, teachers, and parents to find high-quality digital content that supports the Common Core standards.

CFY and PowerMyLearning: Powering a New Generation of Learning


CFY has chosen what it considers the most effective digital learning activities on the web and has made them easily accessible in one trusted place. A free PowerMyLearning account gives users access to…

• Thousands of thoroughly vetted academic games, interactive simulations, virtual labs, and videos.
• Easy-to-find activities tagged by subject, grade level, and Common Core Standards.
• A “Playlist” feature to sequence activities and individualize learning by student or class.
• Lesson plans to incorporate activities into instruction.
• Detailed reports for teachers, parents, and students.
• Badges and Playpoints to reward student usage.
• A flexible platform that can be used in school, after school, at home, or anywhere in between.

With PowerMyLearning, students and parents can discover fun and stimulating activities to reinforce classroom learning and spark new areas of interest, CFY says—while teachers can use the site to help meet the learning needs of their students.

Source: eSchool News and CFYNational (YouTube)


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!

PowerMyLearning offers free, high-quality resources to support Common Core instruction

Developed by the nonprofit organization CFY, PowerMyLearning is a free online platform for K-12 students, teachers, and parents to find high-quality digital content that supports the Common Core standards.

CFY and PowerMyLearning: Powering a New Generation of Learning


CFY has chosen what it considers the most effective digital learning activities on the web and has made them easily accessible in one trusted place. A free PowerMyLearning account gives users access to…

• Thousands of thoroughly vetted academic games, interactive simulations, virtual labs, and videos.
• Easy-to-find activities tagged by subject, grade level, and Common Core Standards.
• A “Playlist” feature to sequence activities and individualize learning by student or class.
• Lesson plans to incorporate activities into instruction.
• Detailed reports for teachers, parents, and students.
• Badges and Playpoints to reward student usage.
• A flexible platform that can be used in school, after school, at home, or anywhere in between.

With PowerMyLearning, students and parents can discover fun and stimulating activities to reinforce classroom learning and spark new areas of interest, CFY says—while teachers can use the site to help meet the learning needs of their students.

Source: eSchool News and CFYNational (YouTube)


If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates!