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Friday, September 25, 2015

Online Seminar—Live - Dealing with Student Behaviors That Compromise Learning

Attend this Online Seminar—Live below.

Dealing with Student Behaviors That Compromise Learning  
Tuesday, October 27, 2015 | 01:00PM Central | Length: 40 Minutes  

Policies alone will not elicit the best work from your students. However, there are ways to help your students recognize how their behaviors affect their grades and their overall success. This seminar will show you how to adjust your teaching style and assignments to keep your students focused before, during, and after class.
Dealing with Student Behaviors That Compromise Learning

A Better Way to Change Student Behavior
Students can be their own worst enemies. Deep down, most of them want to do well. They want to succeed in college and in their careers.

Yet many students have some bad habits that undermine their learning, such as texting instead of taking notes; turning in assignments late; and coming to class sporadically and unprepared. What’s worse is that many do not even see the extent of the harm they are doing. They are sabotaging their futures and they don’t even know it.

Of course, you can see both the behaviors and the inevitable consequences. No matter what you write in the syllabus or how many times you remind them that their behavior will catch up with them, this scenario plays out the same way every term. Students self-sabotage, they underperform, and then they blame the school, the course, or the instructor for their own poor decisions.

But what if you could rewrite the ending? What if you could change some of the things that you do in the classroom to naturally change the way your students behave in—and even out of—the classroom?

Actually, you can. There are many things you can do to help students get out of their own way so they can learn and achieve more.

Dealing with Student Behaviors That Compromise Learning is a new Magna 40-Minute Seminar that prepares you to adjust your current teaching and adopt new practices that will help students assume more responsibility for their own learning and achieve greater success in their coursework.

Source: Magna Publications

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