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Thursday, July 19, 2018

The not-school movement that's helping young people re-engage with learning | Science Daily

Alternative schooling programs could deliver greater learning outcomes for young people who are struggling at school, according to University of South Australia researcher, Dr Thomas Stehlik.

Photo: Nicolas Postiglioni from Pexels

In a paper presented at the Education and New Developments 2018 Conference in Budapest in June, Dr Stehlik says that the growing not-school movement is challenging the confines of traditional schooling because the one-size-fits-all solution for modern education is not working.

"Compulsory schooling is considered a basic responsibility of civil society, yet for many young people, school is a narrow experience that can restrict their potential," Dr Stehlik says.
 
"We need to start looking at education from the perspective of the student.

"The not-school movement is all about encouraging different educational initiatives and practices that 'think outside the box' to provide young people with positive education experiences that they enjoy."

Including all educational programs that occur outside of the school environment, the not-school movement covers activities from art-based initiatives to home schooling. Often unstructured and informal, not-school learning can be delivered by adult educators, youth workers, community developers and parents.

Echoing the findings of Australia's 2018 Gonski Report, Dr Stehlik says that today's mass approach to education is outdated and despite long-term calls for change, little change has occurred.
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Materials provided by University of South Australia.  
Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Educational Philosophy for 21st Century Teachers

The paper is based on a chapter of Dr Stehlik’s new bookEducational Philosophy for 21st Century Teachers.

Source: Science Daily


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