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Friday, September 15, 2017

5 Things You Need To Know Before Choosing To Study Online | Junkee - Uni - Campus

"More and more universities are upgrading their offerings to include classes, units and whole degrees that can be completed from home – or wherever there’s internet access" says Seb Starcevic, freelance writer based in Melbourne.

Photo: The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt/Netflix)

As someone who has studied remotely for the better part of two years, take it from me that this arrangement has its benefits. But it’s also not for everyone.

Forget those frantic, heavily caffeinated early mornings navigating public transport. No more rushing to catch that 6am train or fighting for a parking space. With no butt-in-seat lessons to attend, heading to class is as simple as rolling out of bed and powering on your computer. Pants optional.

For those with mobility issues, this means one less major headache. Same goes for those living more than an hour or two away from campus.

Distance learning’s greatest strength can also be its biggest drawback. Once you’ve removed any reason to venture out into the world, you run the risk of succumbing to social isolation and turning into a full-fledged hermit. Sad reacts only.

No matter how introverted you think you are, human beings have thrived on social interaction since our caveman days. It’s vital to our health – and I say this as a committed shut-in. Give me the Netflix password and a takeout menu and I’ll see you in two weeks.

Of course, isolation isn’t so much an issue for those with an active social life or part-time job pushing them into new social situations. More on that later.

There’s something about lecture theatres that immediately makes me want to doze off. Maybe it’s the way the lecturer always seems to speak in a monotone. Or maybe it’s the ambient lighting, dimmed to comatose levels for a slideshow or video presentation. It’s certainly not because the chairs are comfy.

At any rate, one of the major perks of taking online classes is that lectures are usually pre-recorded, meaning you can listen to them in your own time, fast-forwarding through the boring bits or pausing to rewind that crucial snippet. You can even multi-task by slipping on a pair of headphones and going about your day, a bit like a podcast.
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Source: Junkee


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