Translate to multiple languages

Subscribe to my Email updates

https://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/mailverify?uri=helgeScherlundelearning
If you enjoyed these post, make sure you subscribe to my Email Updates

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Colorado Mesa University plans to add actuarial science courses in the fall | Campus - The Criterion

Actuaries analyze the possible financial impact of risks, summarizes Elias Born, Reporter at The Criterion.

Photo: Colorado Mesa University (CMU)
Colorado Mesa University (CMU) will allegedly be adding some actuarial science classes, starting the fall semester of 2019.

“Over the past 10 years I have had numerous students inquire about having such a degree,” Director of Public Relations David Ludlam said. “Actuarial science applies mathematical and statistical methods to assess risk in insurance, whether it be auto, dwelling, or life.”
CMU already offers most of the classes that usually compose an actuarial science degree. They include finance, risk management, insurance, and economics courses from the business department. 

From the computer science, math and statistics side, calculus, probability, statistics, and linear algebra are already present. “We have decided to offer a BS in mathematics with a concentration in actuarial science,” Ludlam said. “We thought about starting a stand-alone degree but there’s so much overlap with the mathematics degree that there were not enough differences to separate.”

An actuary analyzes the possible financial impact of risks, which puts them into the insurance field often. The career is projected to grow 22 percent in the next ten years.

Actuaries start with a bachelor’s in mathematics, actuarial sciences, business, or a related field. There are six exams, each testing mastery over a certain domain that actuaries cover, from financial models to life contingencies. These exams are taken after a student has graduated from college and is under the care of their employer; their job at their company first is to study for these exams.
Read more...

Source: The Criterion