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Friday, September 21, 2018

The Irish man putting his stamp on Copenhagen’s music scene | Work - The Irish Times

"Wild Geese: For Fergus Murphy, the best part of living in Denmark is work-life balance"  inform Barbara McCarthy, Freelance journalist and photographer - Ireland.


Fergus Murphy has lived in Copenhagen for 16 years with his family. Although he misses Ireland, he could never see himself leaving Denmark and all it has to offer.
Photo: The Irish Times
Fergus Murphy was well prepared for life in Denmark after spending much of his childhood in Cologne, Germany.

“I lived there from the age of four to 10, so I spoke German fluently. It came in handy when I was learning Danish down the line but, that said, Danish is no walk in the park and it’s taken me almost 16 years to master it. But I finally got there.”

Before he set foot on the Scandinavian peninsula, Murphy studied politics and German in UCD and completed an MA in political science, also in UCD...

Murphy had previously worked with the Red Bull Music Academy, a global music institution and platform, which fosters creativity and learning music. He took on various projects with them in the late noughties, before taking a full-time job as a studio manager in 2012.

Collaborations
“The position allowed me to work with a range of international musicians and develop quality collaborations with artists. I also worked on events at the likes of Roskilde festival, one of the biggest festivals in Europe which attracts over 130,000 people annually.”

As somewhat of an expert, Murphy is often called upon to give talks at festivals, including the Storm Electronic music festival and the Rhythmic music conservatory, as well as public talks in libraries. “There is a lot of support from the state here for music and the arts, so you get opportunities in many different forms.”
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Source: The Irish Times